The Face of Pain

Lines of pain etched into her face.  Eyes too bright, revealing the agony inside.   Jaw tight, skin stretched taut.  I never really thought about the descriptions of people in pain that I have read in newspaper stories, magazine articles, online sites, novels and non-fiction books, other than to appreciate the evocative images.  However, it has struck me, that not only are those phrases highly accurate, but they only reveal a small piece of what a person shows externally when they are living with chronic pain.

There are many physical conditions that result in chronic, intense pain.  People with these conditions have to manage to live and try to function in varying degrees of agony, sometimes 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  This is an entirely different situation than the pain that the majority of the population may encounter, say, from a broken bone, childbirth, or dental work.

To add insult to injury, many people suffering from intense chronic pain are told that it is “all in their head” and that they should see a psychologist.  Or they are referred to a pain clinic, whose doctors are more interested in administering the latest drug of the month, likely not covered by insurance, than in listening to the patient and understanding the nature of his or her specific condition.

Chronic pain itself, whatever the underlying cause, is a killer.  The effect of ongoing intense pain on the mind and body actually does result in an earlier death.   http://updates.pain-topics.org/2010/04/severe-chronic-pain-is-killer-study.html

This evidence shows that effective treatment of ongoing severe pain is essential for any sort of positive quality of life.

Thankfully, we at Patient Navigator have unearthed several palliative care physicians who are not only invested in alleviating the patients’ pain, but actually listen to the patient, working with them to improve their quality of life, while coordinating care with other members of the medical care team to treat the underlying cause.  I have seen patients weep in gratitude that a medical professional finally takes them seriously.  I have seen their energy levels increase, and their lives turn around, when they finally find the right balance of medications for pain management.

I have seen their eyes turn bright with smiles, without the pain shadowing behind.

For more information on managing chronic pain, see:

Pain Topics:  http://pain-topics.org/

American Chronic Pain Association: www.theacpa.org

For more information on Palliative care:  http://www.getpalliativecare.org/ and http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/palliativecare.html on Medline.

Submitted by Patient Navigator Debora Harvey

About Elisabeth Schuler Russell

The curator of this blog is Elisabeth Schuler Russell, Founder and President of Patient Navigator, LLC. Her goal is to inform readers about important healthcare topics and teach them to become informed healthcare consumers.
This entry was posted in Cancer, Chronic Disease, Mental Health, Other health issues, Pain and Palliative Care, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Face of Pain

  1. Pingback: Pain Management: Why Doctors Don't Get It | Patient Navigator

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